Category: disappearing trees of roath

memorial trees of roath

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disappearing trees of roath #28 | brenda’s tree

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disappearing trees of roath #29 | edna & gwyn’s tree

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disappearing trees of roath #36 | mike’s tree

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disappearing trees of roath part 3

felling is proceeding apace – most of the designated trees in waterloo gardens had gone when i last visited on the weekend.

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i was particularly sad to see the group of memorial magnolias cut. i’d hoped they might have been dug out and replanted.

i’ve been really heartened by the response i’ve had to this project, although dismayed at the number of people who, for whatever reason, either were uninformed or felt unheard during the consultation process.

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as a park-user but non-immediate resident i have great sympathy for locals who have experienced flood events and fear worse in future. the parks were originally established around a hundred years ago (full info here). these are not ancient native trees but the result of ambitious forward thinking by local planners.

my hope is that the extensive replanting planned will mature in time to create a park as much loved, but more sustainable in the long term. there is irony in the fact that this destruction of parts of a man-made environment results directly from human influence on global climate creating increased flood risk.

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edit 24 feb: since writing this post i’ve read that some of the trees predate the park enclosures, up to 200 years old. also that there has never been damage to property by flooding along the roath brook. which somewhat tempers my optimistic opinion of the works…

disappearing trees of roath part 2

park closures have been more limited than i anticipated \o/ currently confined only to sections of roath mill gardens and waterloo gardens, where the trees had already been tagged with numbers. which leaves time for me to raise awareness of the works further north.

lo-res phone pic
 

i tagged about half a dozen of the trees-to-be-felled through roath brook gardens today. plan is to continue tagging though roath mill gardens and place notices at the gates…

notice
notice

choosing such a visible mark was deliberate; neither me nor my local friends had any awareness of the works, even though they affect our day-to-day lives. i weighed up the impact of  semi-permanently marking a condemned tree vs entirely-permanently removing the same tree. i want these trees to really be seen, more than anything.

i’ve used specialist forestry paint, that causes no harm to the trees, and applied the stencils in more- and less-obvious areas.  i don’t want to spoil anyone’s walk or view but at the same time i don’t want these trees to go down in a sea of silence. i haven’t tagged every tree-to-go, just some of those that would take a mark well. if i got one wrong i’m happy to scrub it off once the parks are re-opened 🙂

the trees are being felled for flood defence works. this interweaving of “human” and “natural” influence is the reason for making these works.

disappearing trees of roath

flood defence works on cardiff’s roath brook will entail extensive construction work and tree removal. as a reasonably local resident i was oblivious to these works until about 10 days ago.

disappearing trees of roath #69
disappearing trees of roath #69

roath’s many parks are a fantastic local amenity, the result of impressive victorian ambition and forward thinking. they stretch from the wild gardens in the north, past roath park lake, through the pleasure gardens and recreation ground, through roath mill and waterloo gardens to railways gardens in the south.

disappearing trees of roath #36
disappearing trees of roath #36 (mike’s tree)

as a regular walker, come rain or shine, i spend a lot of time in and around cardiff’s parks and will be sad to see the demise of some beautiful trees. i wanted to take their final portraits before the parks close to the public.

disappearing trees of roath #31
disappearing trees of roath #31

my timing hasn’t been the best – i imagined i had months rather than days. i hoped to draw public attention beyond the immediate area to the loss of these trees. as the parks close for good on monday i’ve had to telescope a month-long project into a couple of days.

disappearing trees of roath #65
disappearing trees of roath #65